Search - Canalith Repositioning Procedure

Page 1 of 1, showing 0 records out of 0 total, starting on record 0, ending on 0


Description

It is a surgical technique for repositioning of canaliths (calcium carbonate crystals) which have broken loose and have inappropriately moved to semicircular canals of the inner ear. calcium carbonate crystals

Symptoms

It is indicated for treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in which brief episodes of dizziness occur with head movement triggered due to movement of canaliths in the fluid filled chambers of the inner ear.

Pre Procedure

No such preparation is required for the procedure. Inform your doctor about any existing medical conditions.

During Procedure

It is a non invasive procedure and is performed by an ENT surgeon. Anesthesia is not required. The canaliths are repositioned with a series of head and body movements. The canaliths are moved from semicircular canals of inner ear to the urticle where do not cause any symptoms. The patient is asked to lie down in a position that causes movement of canaliths and triggers onset of symptoms. This helps to determine the side and the site of canaliths. In sitting position, the patientís head is held firmly and turned 45 degrees to the affected side. Then the patient is asked to lie down in supine position with head hanging off the edge of the bed at an angle of 45 degrees. The position is maintained for 20-30 seconds or until vertigo symptoms subside. The head is then moved 90 degrees away from the affected side. This position is again held for about 30 seconds. The patient is then rolled onto the shoulder with patientís face at an angle of 45 degree to the floor. This position is maintained for 30 seconds or until vertigo symptoms subside. Then the patient is asked to sit up with the head still turned to the shoulder. Now patient sits upright and this position is held for 30 seconds. The entire maneuver takes a few minutes. It is a non invasive procedure and is performed by an ENT surgeon. Anesthesia is not required. The canaliths are repositioned with a series of head and body movements. The canaliths are moved from semicircular canals of inner ear to the urticle where do not cause any symptoms. The patient is asked to lie down in a position that causes movement of canaliths and triggers onset of symptoms. This helps to determine the side and the site of canaliths. In sitting position, the patientís head is held firmly and turned 45 degrees to the affected side. Then the patient is asked to lie down in supine position with head hanging off the edge of the bed at an angle of 45 degrees. The position is maintained for 20-30 seconds or until vertigo symptoms subside. The head is then moved 90 degrees away from the affected side. This position is again held for about 30 seconds. The patient is then rolled onto the shoulder with patientís face at an angle of 45 degree to the floor. This position is maintained for 30 seconds or until vertigo symptoms subside. Then the patient is asked to sit up with the head still turned to the shoulder. Now patient sits upright and this position is held for 30 seconds. The entire maneuver takes a few minutes.

Post Procedure

Any abrupt head movements should not be done for the next 2 days after the surgery. You must not sleep in a completely horizontal position and also do not sleep on the treated side. Follow-up visits for re-evaluation is very important. Any abrupt head movements should not be done for the next 2 days after the surgery. You must not sleep in a completely horizontal position and also do not sleep on the treated side. Follow-up visits for re-evaluation is very important.

Risk And Complications

The procdure is effective in most of the cases but sometimes it needs to be repeated. The canaliths may not be correctly repositioned and may continue to cause vertigo

    !
    !
    Please provide Name
    Not sure about suggested treatment or a surgery ? Get a free second opinion from our healthcare experts, relax and get the best possible treatment.